Lorazepam Addiction

Defining Ativan

Ativan (Lorazepam) is used to treat anxiety related disorders and belongs to a group of chemicals called benzodiazepines. Some other members of this group are: Diazepam, Alprazolam, Clonazepam and Flunitrazepam. The drug has an intermediate half-life and has all the six effects of typical benzodiazepines: sedation, amnesia, anxiolysis (anti-anxiety), antiemesis (anti-vomiting/nausea), anticonvulsion (anti-seizure), and muscle relaxation. The drug is used in short-term treatment of insomnia and anxiety. The drug finds popular use as a common hospital sedative. The drug is also the most commonly used benzodiazepine in treating patients with an overdose of stimulant drugs.

As with other benzodiazepines, Ativan acts on the GABA receptors in the brain. GABA receptors are responsible for the motor-sensory activities of human beings and Ativan acts on these receptors to “slow down” the human brain.

The drug has a relatively short half-life as compared to other benzodiazepines, but it still has a strong affinity towards GABA receptors.

Side Effects of Ativan

Short-Term

  • Sedation
  • Hypnosis
  • Hypotension
  • Amnesia
  • Ataxia
  • Memory impairment
  • Balance impairment
  • Dizziness
  • Weakness
  • Depression
  • Unsteadiness
  • Nausea
  • Appetite changes
  • Confusion
  • Lack of muscle coordination
  • Insomnia
  • Aggression

Long-Term

  • Tolerance
  • Dependence
  • Addiction
  • Cognitive impairments
  • Suicide ideation
  • Permanent hypotension
  • Aggressive behavior
  • Psychosis

Ativan Do’s and Don’ts

Ativan should be taken as prescribed, so as not to overdose. If a dose is missed, instead of doubling the dosage, take when remembered. Do not take Ativan for longer than necessary.

Ativan should not be shared with anyone else. This is a prescribed drug and sharing with someone who doesn't have a valid prescription may lead to addiction.

Ativan should not be taken while pregnant as it is a Category D drug and can cause death to the unborn baby.

People suffering from asthma, glaucoma, gastric impairments including kidney/liver disorders and people having a history of substance abuse should not take Ativan prior to consulting with a physician.

If you allergic to benzodiazepines or have narrow-angle glaucoma, do not administer Ativan.

Addiction and Overdose

As Ativan is a benzodiazepine, it should be taken with extreme caution. The drug is widely abused because of its sedative “marijuana-like” effects on the brain. Ativan affects the central nervous system of the brain and can be addictive in nature. The drug may have withdrawal symptoms like aggression, depression and insomnia.

Overdose can cause deep sleep, coma, or death. Do not take more than the prescribed dosage or take doses for longer than prescribed as it may lead to serious consequences.

Treatment

Since the half-life for this drug is quite short, drinking lots of fluids can also help flush out the traces of Ativan easily from the body.

Long-term addiction to Ativan should be treated in a drug treatment center. Teams of physicians and therapists work with individuals to help them realize that the addiction to Ativan is the problem. It is important to contact the desired rehabilitation center to see if they have the desired program for treating Ativan addiction

 

Defining Temesta

Temesta (Lorazepam) is an intermediate duration benzodiazepine commonly used as a sedative. Lorazepam has all the six properties that benzodiazepines exhibit: amnesia, sedation, antiemesis, muscle relaxation, anticonvulsion and anxiolysis. The drug is used for short-term treatment of insomnia, anxiety, and acute seizures. Temesta is also given to patients with a tendency towards aggression during rehab treatments. The drug is also useful in curtailing overdose symptoms of stimulants.

Temesta, like all benzodiazepines, acts on the central nervous system, affecting GABA receptor activity. The drug sedates by interacting with the binding sites for benzodiazepine. Temesta has a shorter half-life as compared to other benzodiazepines and is effective for a few hours. However, the drug is highly potent and the doses should be regulated.

Peak effects of Temesta occur roughly 10 minutes after administration in case of an intravenous injection and 60 minutes after the medicine has been administered in its oral form.

Side Effects of Temesta

Short-Term

  • Hypotension
  • Sedation
  • Slowed heart beat
  • Ataxia
  • Confusion
  • Amnesia
  • Heavy Breathing
  • Dizziness
  • Weakness

Long-Term

  • Dependence
  • Tolerance
  • Cognitive disorders
  • Thoughts of suicide
  • Depression
  • Sleep Apnea
  • Aggression
  • Gastric disorders

Temesta Do’s and Don’ts

People should take the dosage in its prescribed quantity and form and increased or decreased only according to doctors’ orders.

People should keep the drug away from children and out of reach of people with a history for addiction.

Temesta should not be coupled with other anti-depressants or alcohol as it can lead to a fatal drop in pulse/heart rates.

Individuals who have been on Temesta for more than 5 weeks, they should not stop taking the drug immediately due to the possibility of withdrawal symptoms.

Temesta should not be administered to people with ataxia as it can further this condition.

Temesta should not be consumed under pregnancy as the drug can be fatal to the unborn child.

People with liver or kidney conditions should not consume Temesta without consulting their physician.

Temesta may bring about allergic reactions in people who are allergic to Lorazepam or other benzodiazepines. Temesta can also cause acute respiratory depression in people with a history of asthma. People with a history of glaucoma or sleep apnea should not take Temesta.

Addiction and Overdose

Temesta, like most benzodiazepines, can be highly addictive. The drug acts on the pleasure center of the brain. Temesta shows heightened sedative properties when coupled with alcohol or other depressants.

Temesta overdose can cause deep slumber, coma, or even death during sleep. Temesta overdose by itself rare, however, when coupled with other depressants, Temesta can be potentially fatal. Individuals should report any signs of overdose, accidental or otherwise, to a doctor and seek immediate medical help.

Treatment

Individuals who are clinically addicted to Temesta may need to be referred to a rehab center. There are a number of good Temesta treatment centers that can help the patient overcome Temesta addiction in a professional manner. Teams of doctors and therapists can help the individuals manage withdrawal symptoms and rid themselves of their addiction so that they can resume living a healthy, drug-free lifestyle.

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